SHIWA NG’ANDU & KAPISHYA HOT SPRINGS

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“We suddenly came upon what I thought was the most beautiful lake I had ever seen. I was surrounded by hilly country, and along its shores were groves of rare trees, of kind sacred to Africans. Friendly folk inhabited the one big village on the lakeshore and there were a dozen herds of different wild game. The surrounding land seemed to be reasonably fertile judging by the crops that were ripening there. I knew at once that I had found what I was looking for.”

Legend has it that the local tribe, having arrived from the Congo onto the north eastern plateau, came across a dead crocodile. They thought this an excellent omen and since the name for crocodile was Ng’andu, they called themselves Bena Ng’andu – ‘The people of the Royal Crocodile’ and settled around the Lake. The Lake became known as Ishiba Ng’andu – ‘The Lake of the Royal Crocodile.’

Gore-Brown purchased 10 000 acres of land near the lake for 2 shillings an acre and called it Shiwa Ng’andu. The First World War necessitated a return to England but six years later he returned as a retired Lieutenant Colonel and set about building the estate with an army building manual, single minded determination and an indomitable energy. Using local materials, recruiting and training builders, carpenters and blacksmiths, he built cottages for his workers, a school, a chapel, a hospital, a post office, a workshop complex and later an airstrip. Eventually, the elaborate manor house, overlooking the Lake was completed in 1932 and the appropriate furnishings, paintings, cutlery and crockery was shipped from England and transported on dirt tracks by ox wagon. His wife Lorna took an active interest in the local culture and environment, encouraging research and carrying out anthropological studies.

They experimented with various crops, essential oils, cattle and timber on the farm and at the same time, Gore Brown was very active in politics contributing to the creation of an independent Zambia. He died at the age of 84 in 1967 and his elder daughter and her husband Major Harvey took over management. They began Shiwa Safaris, which was for many years the only safari company taking visitors to the estate into the wild North Luangwa National park. They also continued with the community development projects started by Gore-Brown. They were sadly murdered in their other home near Lusaka in 1992, but the estate still remains with the Harvey family. The farm as well as the safaris continue to operate. The estate maintains a central role in the development of local farming, providing the resources and expertise allowing local farmers to diversify their output.

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